Texas surf resort tested after 'brain-eating amoeba' death

Tragedy Waco Tank closed as CDC tests for “brain eating amoeba.”
 By Chas Smith
6 hours ago

Tragedy Waco Tank closed as CDC tests for “brain eating amoeba.” By Chas Smith 6 hours ago

The BSR Surf Resort in Waco, Texas has temporarily shut its doors after a surfer from New Jersey died as a result of complications from Naegleria fowleri, which is often referred to as a "brain-eating amoeba".

Parsons said Stabile had been in the park's wave pool. Stabile's headache, fever, confusion, and brain swelling all pointed to some type of bacterial meningitis - a severe and often life-threatening inflammation of the membrane surrounding the brain.

Between 1962 and 2017, there have been 143 known infected individuals reported in the United States - 139 have died, and four have survived.

The amoeba can infect people when it enters the body through the nose.

Fabrizio Stabile, 29, of Ventnor, went into the wave pool at BSR Cable Park in Waco and died a few days later on September 21 at an Atlantic City hospital. "Even so, this drug is not easily accessible", Stabile's friend wrote.

Stuart Parsons, the park owner, said in a statement that it will remain closed until the testing is completed.

He added: '"Our hearts and prayers are with his family, friends, and the New Jersey surf community during this hard time".

A GoFundMe page has been created by Stabile's family and friends to help bring awareness to the rare but preventable infection.

The CDC says Naegleria fowleri is commonly found in warm freshwater and soil. Once it travels through the nose it causes a devastating brain infection called primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). Symptoms generally start about five days after infection, with death occurring about five days later, according to the CDC. PAM is hard to detect because the disease progresses rapidly, so diagnosis is usually made after death, the CDC said.

In light of Stabile's death, officials at the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District are troubleshooting to find the source of the amoeba.

Ten days later, Naegleria fowleri was also detected in a Louisiana water system near Shreveport on September 26, according to KTBS.

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