Soyuz rocket carrying crew to ISS malfunctions during launch

Rocket carrying space station crew fails in mid-air, crew forced to make emergency landing

Rocket carrying space station crew fails in mid-air, crew forced to make emergency landing

An incident took place during the October 11 launch of a Soyuz spacecraft carrying two men to the International Space Station, with the status of the spacecraft and crew now unknown.

"We had an interruption on today's launch", a NASA commentator reported.

The rocket was launched from the Soviet-era cosmodrome in Baikonur, Kazakhstan.

NASA said it has been informed by Russian space officials that the crew has made an emergency landing at an unspecified location in Kazakhstan and is in good condition. Their Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft will arrive at the space station after a quick, 6-hour or "fast track" rendezvous rather than the traditional, two-day route. The first-stage of the Soyuz MS-10 launch appeared flawless until NASA reported the problem just as the crew reached orbit.

An American astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut returned safely to Earth Thursday after a Russian booster rocket carrying them to the International Space Station failed shortly after launch.

A subsequent statement said: "The Soyuz capsule has landed back on Earth carrying two crew members".

The space agency later tweeted that search and rescue teams were headed to site where the astronauts were expected to land.

Ovchinin spent six months on the station in 2016.

Recommended News

We are pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news.
Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper.
Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.