Apple CEO Tim Cook urges Bloomberg to retract spy chip story

Tim Cook shown at a Chicago speaking engagement in March has taken the unusual step of going on the record to deny a news story and is further asking the news agency that published it for a retraction

Tim Cook shown at a Chicago speaking engagement in March has taken the unusual step of going on the record to deny a news story and is further asking the news agency that published it for a retraction

We're living during a time when fake news is affecting almost every facet of our daily lives, so it's important that Bloomberg provide some semblance of transparency over its reporting - at the very least. While the tech giant not only denies the report, it also made a detailed company statement signed by the Vice President of Information Security, refuting the claims of such an incident.

Since that time the story continued to make headlines. "We stand by our story and are confident in our reporting and sources".

Apparently Apple has "turned the company upside down" looking for evidence of such breach. The UK's National Cyber Security Center and the US's Homeland Security have similarly expressed doubts. Having nothing isn't the same thing as knowing with certainty.

The Apple CEO, notably, called on Bloomberg to retract the story - which is an unprecedented move for the company.

"I feel they should retract their story".

According to Buzzfeed, Tim Cook said, "This did not happen. They need to do that right thing", Cook said Thursday.

In response Cook's request for a retraction in the report, Bloomberg repeated that its news was authentic and the research has been conducted for over more than a year.

Cook told BuzzFeed News that he spoke with Bloomberg's report along with former Apple general counsel Bruce Sewell.

Bloomberg has faced strong pushback from the affected companies, including Amazon, and United States government officials, who say they've found no evidence of the secret Chinese spy chip. Every time Bloomberg approached it for a statement, it investigated the claims and found nothing. The news agency said that 17 sources confirmed "the manipulation of hardware and other elements of the attacks". "We also published three companies" full statements, as well as a statement from China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

In its report, Bloomberg has said that a unit of the People's Liberation Army of China had infiltrated Super Micro Computer Inc.'s supply chain.

"We couldn't find anything", he said.

"Please leave us out of this".

"I have grave concerns about where this has taken us", Joyce added.

Cook made the statement as the security community has been casting serious doubt on a Bloomberg Businessweek piece from October 4 that claims China has been exploiting the country's manufacturing supply chain to secretly plant the spy chips.

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