Once in power, House Democrats will reportedly demand Trump's tax returns

Democrats will capture US House of Representatives Fox News projects

Democrats will capture US House of Representatives Fox News projects

Contributor Stephanie Ruhle said Trump's tax loopholes are immoral and below the office of the presidency, but said Trump likes to suggest it's "clever" how he games the system.

"Tremendous success tonight", Trump tweeted.

Democrats are gaining ground in their fight for control of the House, picking up key seats in Florida, Pennsylvania and Minnesota.

Democrats quickly made important gains in the House, but Republicans defended in crucial races, like incumbent Andy Barr of Kentucky, whose House seat had seemed at risk.

Maybe the "blue wave" turned out to be a "blue ripple", Seth Meyers said on Late Night, "but hey, if you've been in the desert for two years, a little splash of water feels like a damn tsunami". Though the Republican gains in the Senate make it even less likely that there would be a two-thirds majority needed to convict a president and evict him from office.

In the Senate, Republican Mike Braun snatched the seat from Democratic Senator Joe Donnelly, but corruption scandal-tainted Senator Bob Menendez saved his seat for the Democrats in New Jersey.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi - who is set to become speaker, a position she held from 2007 to 2011 - told cheering supporters in Washington: "Thanks to you, tomorrow will be a new day in America".

On Tuesday, a number of U.S. House races were close.

"Today is more than about Democrats and Republicans". And other red state Senate Democrats running for re-election - Claire McCaskill in Missouri and Joe Donnelly in IN - did the same. Claire McCaskill in Missouri and Attorney General Mike DeWine defeated Democrat Richard Cordray in the race for OH governor.

History was working against the president in the Senate: 2002 was the only midterm election in the past three decades when the party holding the White House gained Senate seats.

In the House, Democrats picked up seats across the map.

Almost 40 percent of voters cast their ballots to express opposition to the president, according to AP VoteCast, a national survey of the electorate, while about 25 percent said they voted to express support for Trump.

Republicans now have majorities in both chambers of Congress, but polls show that the Democrats are poised to capture the House of Representatives.

Republicans banked on those dynamics being offset by a vibrant economy and by a president whose insult-laden approach to political discourse was as stirring for conservative voters as it was infuriating to liberals.

Trump, who watched the midterm election returns with family and friends at the White House Tuesday evening, settled into a brief role as spectator, after months of campaigning for Republican congressional and gubernatorial candidates.

West Coast results were still coming. Yet a Democratic House could also give Trump a rare chance for bipartisan deal-making as he gears up for re-election.

For Democrats, the road to the 218-seat majority ran through two dozen suburban districts Hillary Clinton won in 2016 and through swaths of Trump country in the Rust Belt and heartland where voters backed the president.

Here's a snapshot of who voted and why in IN, based on preliminary results from AP VoteCast, an innovative nationwide survey of about 138,000 voters and nonvoters - including 3,937 voters and 765 nonvoters in the state of in - conducted for The Associated Press by NORC at the University of Chicago.

Trump boasted a growing economy but campaigned aggressively in the closing days on a hardline anti-immigration message.

Trump's scorched-earth campaigning came to define the 2018 campaign.

Both parties have claimed major victories.

Kansas voted for Trump by 20 points in 2016 and is typically a reliable conservative state.

The verdicts in the House and Senate were based on incomplete results as vote counting continued across the country and some states were still voting in a congressional election cast as an unofficial referendum on Trump. "And that was across the board - African-Americans, Latinos, suburban women".

Trump did not care for the soft-focus ad, which notably did not mention him, according to a person familiar with the president's thinking who was not authorized to speak publicly.

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