Hawaiian monk seal has eel removed from its nose

Hawaiian Monk Seal Gets Eel Stuck Up Its Nose

Hawaiian Monk Seal Gets Eel Stuck Up Its Nose

Regardless, we're happy to hear this sweet, vaguely irritated monk seal has been returned to its normal, eel-less state. We have now found juvenile seals with eels stuck in their noses on multiple occasions.

Researchers first spotted a seal with an eel nasal appendage in the summer of 2016, emailing colleagues who initially thought it was a joke.

In what is truly a freaky phenomenon reportedly stumping researchers, a handful of not-so-smart Hawaiian monk seals have recently been observed with eels stuck up their noses - possibly from shoving their faces into crevices, but researchers tasked with observing these fools can't say for sure. NOAA says of the slippery phenomenon, which has been recorded several times.

The administration said it has seen the same "eels in noses" phenomenon almost a handful of times in the last few years.

According to the final post in this saga, researchers were able to trap the seal and extract a 60cm-long goddamn eel from its nose, noting that it "was surprising as only about 10cm were hanging out" of its nose before extraction. "We don't know if this is just some odd statistical anomaly or if we will see more eels in seals in the future", NOAA said.

'They are looking for prey that likes to hide, like eels. "The eels, however, did not make it", writes marine biologist Brittany Dolan in the Facebook post. Since Hawaiian monk seals forage for food by shoving their face into the tight space around coral reefs, it is possible that the occasionally cornered eel could mistake a seal's nostril for an escape route.

Once revealed the seal was in good health, social media users couldn't help but poke a little fun at the "rebel" sea creature. "We might never know".

There are only an estimated 632 mature Hawaiian monk seals left in the wild, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. "All the seals were released and haven't shown any issues from the incidents", NOAA adds.

One theory is that seals, which often regurgitate their meals, are simply throwing up eels through their noses.

Now if they could just keep their noses clean.

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