Google Marks Winter Solstice, Shortest Day Of The Year With A Doodle

A man walks at Golden Gardens on Wednesday. The winter solstice arrived Friday which means the days will gradually get longer

A man walks at Golden Gardens on Wednesday. The winter solstice arrived Friday which means the days will gradually get longer

In December, the Earth's North Pole turns away from the Sun, giving the Southern Hemisphere the most sunlight.

When does the solstice occur?

That tilt is about 23.45 degrees (for now), and it bathes different parts of the world with various intensities of light over the course of a year.

The reason behind this phenomenon is that the Earth is tilted on its axis by 23.5° relative to the plane of the planet's orbit.

This trend will continue until the summer solstice on 21 June, the longest day of the year, after which the days will start to grow shorter once again. The moon has taken on the names cold moon, cold full moon, long night moon and the moon before yule, CNN reported.

In 1898, the Winter Solstice was more than just the dawn of a new year - it was also the dawn of the atomic age.

A snowy Google Doodle on Friday marked the 2018 winter solstice, the shortest day of the year when the Earth is farthest from the Sun.

There's some hope to be found in the gloom of these dark December days: The winter solstice is here, which means the days will gradually get longer after Friday.

Winter solstice in India In India, we don't see a drastic difference in the lengths of the day and night.

Winter solstice takes place twice in a year, once in each hemisphere.

However, when you're looking out into a clear sky on Friday night, the moon will appear full to you - and could be so bright that people with pretty good eyesight could read by it.

Now what about that meteor shower?

According to spaceweather.com, the Ursid meteor shower isn't overly active most years only producing 5 to 10 meteors per hour.

The second astronomical event will be something to watch in the sky.

The moon will still appear beautifully full enough on the solstice, even it's not as rare as if it were officially full.

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