El Chapo Convicted on All Counts in Federal Court

“El Chapo” Found Guilty On 10 Counts In New York Trial

“El Chapo” Found Guilty On 10 Counts In New York Trial

Joaquín Archivaldo Guzmán Loera, more commonly known by the nickname "El Chapo", once considered the most powerful and feared drug trafficker in the entire world, was found guilty on all counts related to leading Mexico's Sinaloa cartel on Tuesday.

Jurors in federal court in Brooklyn found the 61-year-old guilty on all 10 counts. He will spend the rest of life in prison now that he has been convicted.

The 61-year-old Guzman broke out of Mexican prisons twice before he was finally recaptured and extradited to the USA in 2017.

After being escorted off the plane at MacArthur Airport on Long Island in shackles, Guzman, 61, then sat in a chair in a hangar surrounded by United States federal agents looking stunned and scared for his life - and appeared to wipe a tear from his eyes. When the jury was discharged, he leaned back in his chair to catch the eye of his wife, Emma Coronel Aispuro, who gave him a subtle thumbs-up.

The legend of Guzman was burnished by two dramatic escapes he made from Mexican prisons and by a Robin Hood image he cultivated among Sinaloa's poor. The notorious cartel boss, born Joaquín Archivaldo Guzmán Loera, has been on trial in NY, which featured testimony from multiple witnesses.

They were escorted to and from the fortress-like Brooklyn courthouse by US Marshals during each day of the 35 day trial, which saw 56 prosecution witnesses called to testify against El Chapo.

During the trial, more than 50 witnesses testified to the Sinaloa cartel leader's willingness to use violence against enemies of a cartel that prosecutors say smuggled at least 200 tons of cocaine into the US for more than two decades.

Mexico has been mired for 12 years in a deadly military-led war against drug gangs.

The evidence included testimony from 14 cooperators.

Through them, jurors heard how the Sinaloa Cartel gained power amid the shifting allegiances of the Mexican drug trade in the 1990s, eventually coming to control nearly the entire Pacific coast of Mexico.

A former bodyguard testified that he watched Guzman kill three rival drug cartel members, including one victim who he shot and then ordered to be buried even as he was still gasping for air.

Guzmán, once listed on Forbes' Billionaires List, has always been a slippery and near-mythical figure. Unlike other people in a similar position, Guzman would not plead guilty and went for a public trial after being extradited to the US.

The most shocking allegation came from Guzman's former top aide Alex Cifuentes, who accused former Mexican president Enrique Pena Nieto of taking a $100 million bribe from Guzman.

In one of the trial's final days, Guzman told the judge he would not testify in his own defence.

In 2015, he pulled off another jail break, escaping a maximum-security prison through a 10-metre deep tunnel.

The defendant had previously escaped from jail by hiding in a laundry bin in 2001.

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